Archive for January, 2016

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

The Gift of Gab? – Part 2

TamaraJonesBy Tamara Jones
ESL Instructor, Howard Community College
Columbia, Maryland
jonestamara@hotmail.com

In a recent post, I talked about my struggle with keeping my Teacher Talk Time (TTT) in check. I had the pleasure of facilitating a professional development session on the topic for Montgomery County Coalition for Adult English Literacy (MCAEL), and I wanted to share some of the research I came across.

In Part 1 of this series, I outlined the debate that has dominated the discussion about TTT. After doing a fair amount of background reading, I have arrived at the conclusion that while excessive TTT does reduce students’ chances to practice the language themselves, good TTT can provide a valuable model and can take the positive format of explicit instruction. As Harmer (2007) points out, “We should not talk simply about the difference between STT [Student Talk Time] and TTT, but also consider TTQ (Teacher Talking Quality)” (Harmer, 2007, p. 38).

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Tuesday, January 12, 2016

The Gift of Gab? – Part 1

TamaraJonesBy Tamara Jones
ESL Instructor, Howard Community College
Columbia, Maryland
jonestamara@hotmail.com

I feel like I should start this post with a disclaimer. I love to talk. I love telling a funny story to a rapt group of listeners. I love the feeling of being the center of attention. For this very reason, I struggle with reigning in my Teacher Talk Time (TTT) in the classroom. After all, there is almost nothing more enticing to a gabber like me than a captive audience of students who laugh appreciatively in (mostly) the right places and appear to hang on my every word. So, because I can really get carried away, I have to work hard to avoid turning every lesson into “The Tamara Show.” That’s why, when I was given the opportunity to facilitate a professional development session for the Montgomery County Coalition for Adult English Literacy, I leapt at the opportunity to learn a bit more about strategies for keeping TTT in check.

A Bit of Background

In the literature I encountered, there seemed to be two camps when it comes to TTT. Opponents of TTT rightly point out that too much TTT discourages authentic communication. Teachers “speak more, more often, control the topic of conversation, rarely ask questions for which they do not have the answers, and appear to understand absolutely everything the students say, sometimes before they even say it” (Musumeci, 1996, p. 314). Does that sound familiar? It does to me.

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