Archive for May, 2016

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

English Spelling: Making Sense of the Chaos (Part 1)

TamaraJonesBy Tamara Jones
ESL Instructor, Howard Community College
Columbia, Maryland
jonestamara@hotmail.com

The experts tell us that that English has a loose sounds-spelling correspondence “as a consequence of 16 centuries of unmanaged spelling” (Brown, 2016, p. 167). That’s just the academic way of saying that spelling in English is nothing short of a nightmare. As a child, I struggled with spelling. I sweated over lists of seemingly random letter combinations every weekend in preparation for Monday morning spelling quizzes. I puzzled about silent letters, schizophrenic vowels, and “rules” that had more exceptions than conformities. I misspelled “maybe” until I was well into high school. Nothing associated with spelling came easily to me.

Perhaps this is why I am so sympathetic when my students express frustration about English spelling. It is far less regular than spelling in many other languages and my ESL students are often perturbed when they realize English words aren’t usually spelled the way the sound, like words are in their L1s. This lack of regularity is the very reason native English speakers spend a disproportionately large amount of school time memorizing words and learning spelling rules (Seymour, Aro and Erskine, 2003).

From Struggling Speller to Teacher

Despite an ongoing personal dread of all things spelling related, I agreed to teach a spelling class last Fall when the adjunct instructor who had been assigned the class got a full-time job elsewhere. I reasoned that, if nothing

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Thursday, May 19, 2016

ESL SmackDown – Writing vs. Speaking

TamaraJonesBy Tamara Jones
ESL Instructor, Howard Community College
Columbia, Maryland
jonestamara@hotmail.com

Several months ago, I was at a local ELT conference when I heard something I haven’t been able to shake. Eli Hinkel was delivering the plenary and somehow the topic of speaking vs. writing arose. Someone in the row behind me said, “Well, everybody knows that writing is harder than speaking.” Directly after that, I heard screeching tires. Well, in my head, anyway. What?!? Writing is harder than speaking? Everybody knows this? I remember looking around me to see if anyone else was having the OMG moment that I was, and made eye contact with my equally perturbed colleague, but everyone else was happily nodding.

While this seems to have been a given for many of the teachers in the auditorium on that sunny fall day, it wasn’t for me. Writing necessarily harder than speaking? Really? As the plenary continued, I mulled this over.

What’s so hard about writing?

What do writers have to do? Well, they have to think about grammar and vocabulary. But, then again, so do

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Thursday, May 5, 2016

The Cellphone Debate

TamaraJonesBy Tamara Jones
ESL Instructor, Howard Community College
Columbia, Maryland
jonestamara@hotmail.com

We’ve all been there, right? The lesson is going well. The students are engaged. I am sharing pearls of ESL wisdom in an accessible and entertaining fashion. I am scanning the back of the room, when all of a sudden I see a student with his/her head bowed. Sadly, that student is not being momentarily overcome by the sheer brilliance of my teaching methodology. More likely, that student is on his/her cellphone.

ARGH!

According to an NPR report on innovation in education, How to get Students to Stop Using their Cellphones in Class, college-aged students in the US use their cellphones an average of 8 to 10 hours every day and check them an average of every 15 to 20 minutes. If that first statistic doesn’t blow your mind (seriously, 8 to 10 hours every day?!?), the fact that in a 2 hour class, our students, on average, are checking their phones 6 to 8 times just might.

Two Sides of the Cellphone War

Okay, for the record, I know I am old and I have an old person’s relationship with my cellphone. I have an old

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