Archive for Tag: brain

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

What Does It Take to Learn?

TamaraJonesTamara Jones is an ESL Instructor at Howard Community College, Columbia, Maryland

What can we do in our classes to facilitate student learning? What activities increase learning? Are we inadvertently doing anything to impede learning? These are certainly some of the most important questions that language teachers are (or should be) asking. After all, student learning is the whole point, right?

But, we know from our experience in front of the classroom that teaching doesn’t necessarily equal learning. How many times have you taught a grammar structure or a vocabulary word only to be met by blank stares when “reviewing” it in the following lesson. Learning is rarely a straight forward movement, and that old saying about taking a step forward and three steps back seems really apt when the topic of learning comes up.

Fortunately, researchers have some suggestions about biologically proven ways to increase student learning in our classes. In other words, there are things that we can do as teachers to help students learn more easily and more fully. In a recent professional development session delivered by Lynn (2017), she highlighted three best practices for facilitating learning in our ESL and EFL classes.

Before I share what I learned, it might be helpful to understand how learning physically happens in the brain. So, get ready for some incomprehensible figures. According to researchers, we are born with 100,000,000,000 neurons in our brains, we can grow 700 new neurons every day, and each neuron has dendrite branches (like leafless tree branches) that can make 10,000 connections each over the course of our lives. Each connection represents learning. When we learn about something, synapses, which are located in various places along the dendrite branches, fire and a new connection between two dendrite branches is made. The stronger the learning, the stronger the connection.

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Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Windows, Rubber Bands, and Neurosculpting

By Tamara Jones
EAL Instructor, British School of Brussels
jonestamara@hotmail.com

Recently I attended a professional development session offered by renowned educator and educational psychologist, Dr. Jo Ann Deak. Among many other interesting things, Dr. Deak spoke about the brain’s physiognomy and how it relates to language learning. It was a fascinating session; I learned some new things and found some of my long-held beliefs upheld by current research. (I just love it when both of these things come out of the same professional development session. Don’t you?)

Windows

According to Dr. Deak, everyone is born with about one hundred billion “short, skinny and naked” neurons in their brain. James Zull, in The Art of Changing the Brain, likens these neurons to a “leafless tree in an Ohio winter” because apparently that’s what they look like under a microscope. These neurons become robust at different times. This means that there are optimal time periods for certain kinds of brain development. For instance, the judgement centers of our brains aren’t fully formed until we are in our 40s. So, the window for the growth and expansion of the neurons in the part of our brains that controls the judgements we make is open until we are almost middle aged.

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